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Sam Shepard on...himself

Our Production Dramaturg William Steinberger has pulled some key quotes from Sam Shepard. We will share Mr. Shepard's thoughts about his past, his family, and himself.

Sam Shepard on himself:

“I’ve heard writers talk about ‘discovering a voice,’ but for me that wasn’t a problem. There were so many voices that I didn’t know where to start. It was splendid, really; I felt kind of like a weird stenographer. I don’t mean to make it sound like hallucination, but there were definitely things there, and I was just putting them down. I was fascinated by how they structured themselves, and it seemed like the natural place to do it was on a stage. A lot of the time when writers talk about their voice they’re talking about a narrative voice. For some reason my attempts at narrative turned out really weird. I didn’t have that kind of voice, but I had a lot of other ones, so I thought, Well, I’ll follow those. – The Paris Review, 1997

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Meet our Lambs!

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Our lambs for Curse of the Starving Class arrived safely last Saturday! We thought it would be nice to give everyone some background on our new friends.

The lambs used in this production are purebred Southdowns which are known for their gentle disposition. They were removed from their mothers because the mothers delivered more babies than she could raise. They are healthy, bottle fed lambs and every effort is being made to ensure their continued health. They are owned by the Manatawna/Saul 4-H Club which is located here in Philadelphia. Members of the club are carefully monitoring the care of the animals while they are with the theater.

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Sam Shepard on...his family

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Our Production Dramaturg William Steinberger has pulled some key quotes from Sam Shepard. We will share Mr. Shepard's thoughts about his past, his family, and himself.

Sam Shepard on his family:

“Those Midwestern women from the forties suffered an incredible psychological assault, mainly by men who were disappointed in a way that they didn’t understand. While growing up I saw that assault over and over again, and not only in my own family. These were men who came back from the war, had to settle down, raise a family and send the kids to school—and they just couldn’t handle it. There was something outrageous about it. I still don’t know what it was—maybe living through those adventures in the war and then having to come back to suburbia. Anyway, the women took it on the nose, and it wasn’t like they said, ‘Hey Jack, you know, down the road, I’m leaving.’ They sat there and took it. I think there was a kind of heroism in those women. They were tough and selfless in a way. What they sacrificed at the hands of those maniacs . . .”  – The Paris Review, Spring 1997