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Images from Athens

Posted Friday, August 28, 2015 - 9:20pm

Hello from Philadelphia! It's Brian Ratcliffe again. Jered and I have returned from Greece, and are now fully engaged in the rehearsal process for Antigone. Before too much time passes, I thought I would take an opportunity to share a few more thoughts and images from our extraordinary experience abroad. Below are a handful of photos that I took in Greece, with captions. Enjoy! 

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Training with Terzopoulos

Posted Friday, July 17, 2015 - 6:12am

Γεια σας! Hello, everybody. This is Brian. In the last post we wrote mainly about the political situation in Greece, and while there is still an enormous amount to say about all that, today's post will focus on the workshop that Jered and I have been attending at Attis Theater, taught by Founding Artistic Director Theodoros Terzopoulos and his company member, Savvas Stroumpos. A Disclaimer: everything below represents my own current understanding of the teachings and practices that we have been receiving over the last few weeks. To the extent that it (inevitably) misrepresents the philosophy or methodology of Mr. Terzopoulos, it's my own fault.

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From Greece: Wilma Hothouse Company Members Jered McLenigan and Brian Ratcliffe share their experiences while training in Greece

Posted Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 11:11am

Καλημέρα! Good morning from Athens, Greece! This is Jered McLenigan writing. Brian Ratcliffe and I have the absolute pleasure of being here for a 30-day intensive training program with Attis Theatre, under the tutelage of Savvas Stroumpos and Theodoros Terzopoulos. Philadelphia actress Rachel Camp joined us in the work for the first ten days; Wilma actors Sarah Gliko and Ed Swidey will be here for the final ten days. Mr. Terzopoulos will be directing the first production of The Wilma's 2015/16 season, ANTIGONE, which Brian, Sarah, Ed and I will be performing in, alongside 4 other Philadelphia actors and 4 actors from Athens. We've been here for about a week and a half, and our bodies have finally (sort of) adjusted to the time difference. Today is our first day off––the program consists of three separate ten day cycles with one day off in between––so we thought this would be a good moment to say hello and talk a little bit about our experience here so far.

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“Hm, Kafka…”

Posted Tuesday, May 12, 2015 - 10:20am

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead dramaturg Nell Bang-Jensen will take us through Tom Stoppard's breakthrough play. Check back for notes and behind-the-scenes content for the Wilma's upcoming show!

“Hm, Kafka…”


Tom Stoppard is notorious for repeating his own jokes. Lines in his plays will appear in his novels, or other plays, years later. He is the playwriting king of upcycling. This method of collaging is a central feature of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. In it, Stoppard mixes Shakespeare’s text, as well as bits of Oscar Wilde and Samuel Beckett, with his own words. (Many critics focus on the direct links to Waiting for Godot specifically.) Despite this, Stoppard seems unconcerned about the intertextuality of his work. He believes plays are events to be experienced, not literary documents to be analyzed. As he says, “Playwrights try to move people, to tears or laughter. To sit in the theatre and mutter, ‘Ah Pirandello!’—or ‘Hm, Kafka….’ Would be curious indeed.” Although by their very nature, both the play and the characters in it, are dependent on other narratives, what would happen if we experienced this story on its own? Who would R&G be without Hamlet?

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“The most expendable people of all time.”

Posted Tuesday, May 5, 2015 - 4:57pm

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead dramaturg Nell Bang-Jensen will take us through Tom Stoppard's breakthrough play. Check back for notes and behind-the-scenes content for the Wilma's upcoming show!

“The most expendable people of all time.”

When Tom Stoppard set out to write Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, he was not interested in creating a parody of Hamlet.  For Stoppard, it was the characters of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern (R&G) who invited dramatic potential; not their Shakesperean context. As he says: “Something alerted me to the serious reverberations of the characters. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, the most expendable people of all time. Their very facelessness makes them dramatic; the fact that they die without ever really understanding why they lived makes them somehow cosmic."  R&G are so undeniably ordinary that the questions they ask transcend their specific context and point toward larger philosophical ones.  As they try to understand exactly what play they’re in (and how to avoid the fate that the play’s very title determines), larger questions are raised about free will, and our sense of purpose. Are we all merely actors in someone else’s script, and if so, how do we gain control of the story? Would we want to? 

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