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The Rise of Women?

An essay by William Steinberger

The End of Men: And the Rise of Women, proclaims the Atlantic’s Hanna Rosin in her recent, controversial book. The Great Recession has intensified decades of change to the American workplace; almost 80% of the 8 million jobs lost belonged to men, owing to the evaporation of the manufacturing sector. In 2012 women surpassed men as the majority of the American workforce and now earn 42.2% of family income. They earn 60% of college degrees, too.

Women like Nora – single, urban twenty-somethings – earn more on average than their male counterparts, though as historian Stephanie Coontz notes, this trend evaporates when limiting this sample to those with equal education. And while women’s real wages have risen (as men’s stagnate or fall), they started from a drastically lower point. Of the overall economy, Coontz argues that “what we are seeing is a convergence in economic fortunes, not female ascendance,” disagreeing with Rosin’s assessment that “given the power of the forces pushing at the economy, this setup feels like the last gasp of a dying age rather than the permanent establishment.”

Two Plays, Between Two Mediums

Leslye Headland is on a serious roll, generating buzz in theatre, film and TV. Assistance, slotted for TV adaptation at NBC, leaves audiences in stitches. The film adaptation of her critically-acclaimed play Bachelorette premiered at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. The film, which Leslye directed, was hailed by the New York Times as “viciously funny satire…with the crackling intensity of machine-gun fire.” Bachelorette received wide release in September and is currently available to rent.

Like Assistance, Bachelorette belongs to Leslye’s Seven Deadly Sins series; the former treats greed, the latter gluttony. Both plays take an unflinching look at Millennials, treating Leslye’s generation with her signature snark. Bachelorette follows a trio of single women (played by Kirsten Dunst, Isla Fisher and Lizzy Caplan) as they grudgingly play bridesmaids to their overweight friend, Becky (Rebel Wilson). The women arrange an epic bacchanal for Becky’s bachelorette party, but queen bee Regan (Kirsten Dunst) can’t resist instructing the male stripper to call Becky by her high school nickname – Pigface. Old tensions flare, spurring a series of events that includes the ripping of Becky’s wedding dress.

Bosszilla

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Earlier this week, METRO published an article about our current production of Assistance by Leslye Headland. In the article, actor Kate Czajkowski describes her own experience working for a horrible boss in a knick-knack shop:

"He would berate those of us who worked there on a regular basis. Our paychecks were constantly bouncing and he was a total jerk to us, so it was pretty frequent that he would lose it on someone and they would walk out the door grabbing a couple things on their way. Most of us left that place with a really amazing sugar bowl."

Horrible bosses, or “Bosszillas,” have been a wellspring for comic fodder. Consider Meryl Streep’s vicious Miranda Priestly in the Devil Wears Prada or the more self-serving and wildly inappropriate David Brent, played by Ricky Gervais the UK television series The Office

Whispers and rumors of real-life Bosszillas feed the gossip mill of corporate America, and for a ‘can-it-be-true?’ laugh, we wanted to share some of our favorite Bosszilla lore.